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Items filtered by date: Wednesday, 08 July 2020

Revised 13th July
The campaigning organisation Comprehensive Future (CF) has published a lengthy article whose main purpose appears to be to attack me. For the second time, this uses false data they have published relating to grammar schools and Pupil Premium children. The problem dates back to a previous CF article about grammar schools two years ago, which wrongly stated, ‘When asked how many pupils were admitted through these priority policies 80 schools responded, revealing that just 574 disadvantaged pupils were offered admission out of their 12,431 available places... there were 22 selective schools who responded to say they had failed to admit a single disadvantaged pupil through their policies’.  Unfortunately, in order to obtain these figures, the authors of both CF articles used figures from a database that has no basis in reality and then have compounded the fiction by using data taken from the wrong column of the database, to make these false claims about grammar school performance, damaging to the image of these schools. The whole fulfils the well-known IT mantra of ‘Garbage in, Garbage out’, twice over.
 
CF has informed me that their published article is the continuation of what I was told was a confidential email correspondence, about a single phrase in a minor paragraph of an article I wrote earlier this year which they have chosen to open up in this way. That article was also about grammar schools and Pupil Premium, although mainly factual rather than theirs which is polemical. The phrase that CF objected to was: ‘demonstrating the falsehood of a previous claim by them’. The new article alleges that I ‘accuse CF of falsifying data. We refute these allegations and object most strongly to the implication that anyone who is a part of Comprehensive Future would alter or fabricate figures supplied in response to an FOI request’, which of course I didn’t, but this misuse of statistics does beg too many questions,  explored below.